Saving species from extinction
Click to read: Volunteers needed in the Caribbean

Volunteers needed in the Caribbean

Durrell is offering you a unique opportunity to get involved with one of its global projects and work at the cutting-edge of conservation. Volunteers are urgently needed in the Caribbean and this could be your chance to have an impact and help save species from extinction.

Since the 1970’s Durrell has been working with the Saint Lucia Ministry of Agriculture’s Forestry Department on conservation of the island’s biodiversity. Durrell’s conservation approach is primarily species led and we focus on the monitoring, protection and management of rare, endemic and highly threatened species.

To achieve our conservation goals, we rely on the support that volunteers can provide to these long-term projects. We are currently looking for four volunteers to commit to six months in St Lucia, starting in February this year.

Volunteer activities will be focused around the implementation of control techniques for removing alien invasive iguanas and the management of a translocated meta-population of Saint Lucia whiptail lizards. Work will also include monitoring and examining populations of the white-breasted thrasher on Saint Lucia.

Ideally, applicants will have a background in biological sciences (preferably at graduate level) and experience of working in the tropics. However, similar prior experience, a determination to work, under sometimes uncomfortable or frustrating conditions, combined with good physical fitness and careful attention to data recording are the most important attributes we look for.

Volunteers will need to cover their own flights, vaccinations and personal equipment but Durrell will cover your insurance and in-country costs for basic subsistence and accommodation.

This is the ideal opportunity for someone looking for practical conservation experience working with some of the world's most threatened species. However, this is also fulltime work that requires the volunteer to be independent and self-motivated. Working hours are typically long and usually for 6 days per week with one day off. But the opportunity to live and work in a tropical country on real conservation projects will be more than compensation for this for the right candidates.

If you are interested in applying and would like to find out more, please visit the Recruitment section on the website.


 

Posted 8 January 2010

 
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